Journalist @baltimoresun writer artist runner #amwriting Chaplain PIO #partylikeajournalist

Journalist @baltimoresun writer artist runner #amwriting Chaplain PIO #partylikeajournalist
Journalist @baltimoresun writer artist runner #amwriting Md Troopers Assoc #20 & Westminster Md Fire Dept Chaplain PIO #partylikeajournalist

Monday, April 24, 2017

I am so tired of hearing about politics. Make it stop. Make it stop.

Westminster Maryland to Hold Election for Mayor and Council Members




Westminster voters will head to the polls on May 9 to vote for Mayor and two seats on the Common Council.

From the City of Westminster: Westminster voters will head to the polls on May 9, 2017 to vote for Mayor and two seats on the Common Council. The term of office for both Mayor and Common Councilmember is four years.

City residents may vote from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. at their designated polling place. Registered Westminster voters who reside on the west side of Maryland Route 31 vote at the Westminster Community Center, located at 325 Royer Road. Voters residing on the east side of Maryland Route 31 vote at the John Street Quarters of the Westminster Fire Company, located at 28 John Street.

Candidates for the office of Mayor are Joe Dominick and Kevin R. Utz. Candidates for the two open seats on the Common Council are Tony Chiavacci, Ann Thomas Gilbert, and Benjamin Yingling.

The deadline for submitting a request for an absentee ballot is 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April 28, 2017. Information on obtaining an absentee ballot and general election information can be found here or by calling Shannon Visocsky, City Clerk, at (410) 848-4938.

Related: Patch has carried this release here - by Jamie Wilkins (Patch Staff) – on April 19, 2017 https://patch.com/maryland/westminster/westminster-hold-election-mayor-council-members


And also related: Our May 9th, 2017 Westminster municipal elections and this day in history March 30, 1999. https://kevindayhoffwestgov-net.blogspot.com/2017/04/our-may-9th-2017-westminster-municipal.html


And: Anyway - This Day in History: March 30, 1999 Kevin Dayhoff for Westminster Common Council http://kevindayhoff.blogspot.com/2017/03/this-day-in-history-march-30-1999-kevin.html

On this day in the Westminster municipal elections, March 30, 1999, I finished, and turned-in, my Carroll County Times questionnaire and candidate profile, and sent in an ad to the paper…


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Saturday, April 22, 2017

Grand National Steeplechase Butler Md. April 22, 2017.


Grand National Steeplechase Butler Md. April 22, 2017. 

Small and Medium pony division of The Fifteenth Thomas L. MacFarlane Memorial


Small and Medium pony division of The Fifteenth Thomas L. MacFarlane Memorial Field Master's Chase. 22Apr2017 Grand National Steeplechase Butler Md.

Labels: 

Grand National Steeplechase Butler Md


Grand National Steeplechase Butler Md. April 22, 2017. Four races. First race: The Fifteenth Thomas L. MacFarlane Memorial Field Master's Chase.

Labels: , , , , 

Friday, April 21, 2017

The 1993 annual Carroll County Maryland 4-H FFA Fair program.


The 1993 annual Carroll County Maryland 4-H FFA Fair program.

Of all the fair programs in my library, this must be the most extensive and comprehensive. It is approximately 380 pages.

I explained much of the history and traditions of the fair in an August 2, 2015 piece I wrote for the Baltimore Sun: “Annual Carroll County Fair set for this week,” Eagle Archives, By Kevin E. Dayhoff, http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-archives-county-fair-0802-20150731-story.html



[…]

The “annual Carroll County 4-H and FFA Fair at the Agriculture Center just south of Westminster” Maryland.

[…]

The first mention of a Carroll County ‘fair’ seems to have occurred in the days immediately following the Battle of Gettysburg, July 1-4, 1863. In “Recollections,” Dr. Joshua Hering describes, “A temporary camp was made in a field on the “Fairground Hill,” immediately to the left of the turnpike.”


*****

A is for Asparagoose: A Plant + Animal ABC Book by Veronica Fannin


A is for Asparagoose: A Plant + Animal ABC Book by Veronica Fannin

April 20, 2017

Reward: Get a first-edition copy of the book and a T-shirt printed with the page of your choice!

Veronica Fannin says:

Wow. A is for Asparagoose is 50% funded!!! Thanks to YOU, my first 50 backers!

We still have a ways to go, so keep up the awesome work sharing and telling people about this project!

A silly and smart hand-lettered alphabet book with 26 original illustrations of fun-to-say plant + animal hybrids. Giggles guaranteed. Pre-order your copy of A is for Asparagoose now: http://www.veronicafannin.com/kickstarter

The link to the Kickstarter page is: www.veronicafannin.com/kickstarter

The link to the Facebook page is:


Thank you all SOOO MUCH!

-Veronica

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Scarlet Detjen
*****

The Veteran’s Administration – giving you a second opportunity to die for your country.



Single-Payer Health Care: America Already Has It

The Veteran’s Administration – giving you a second opportunity to die for your country.

The Veteran’s Administration – giving you a second opportunity to die for your country. A reality check on the idea of going to a single payer health care system – as if the current system is not bad enough.

We do not need Obamacare repealed and replaced. We need it fixed. The answer is more accountability and more competition.

Meanwhile this YouTube is yet another reminder of the horrors of the one example of a US government-run single payer healthcare
system.

Each and every one of my experiences of reaching-out to the VA to advocate for a veteran has been horrific of unbelievable proportions. If this is an example of a US government-run single payer healthcare system, we are all going to go broke paying the necessary healthcare taxes – and then die.

YouTube: “Could a single-payer, government-run health care
system work in the United States? We already know the answer, because America
already has single-payer, government-run health care. Author and commentator
Pete Hegseth explains.” 10Apr2017



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Baltimore Sun Carroll Eagle: 
Tumblr: Kevin Dayhoff Banana Stems www.kevindayhoff.tumblr.com/
Kevin Dayhoff is an artist - and a columnist for:
Baltimore Sun - Carroll County Times - The Carroll Eagle: www.explorecarroll.com: http://www.explorecarroll.com/search/?s=Dayhoff&action=GO

Smurfs: http://babylonfluckjudd.blogspot.com/
Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/

E-mail: kevindayhoff(at)gmail.com

My http://www.explorecarroll.com/ columns appear in the copy of the Baltimore Sunday Sun that is distributed in Carroll County: https://subscribe.baltsun.com/Circulation/

See also - Kevin Earl Dayhoff Art www.kevindayhoff.com: Travel, art,artists, authors, books, newspapers, media, writers and writing, journalistsand journalism, reporters and reporting, music, culture, opera... Ad maioremDei gloriam inque hominum salutem. “Deadline U.S.A.” 1952. Ed Hutcheson:“That's the press, baby. The press! And there's nothing you can do about it. Nothing!”- See more at: http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/#sthash.4HNLwtfd.dpuf
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Thursday, April 20, 2017

The last words of SPC Jordan Shay



April 20, 2017 by Kevin Dayhoff

I awakened early this morning to an odd email that enigmatically resulted from a series of events from 2009 – August, late summer 2009. On any given day, I can barely remember what I had for breakfast, much less, recall events from eight-years ago.

But it came to me quickly. The email came from a commenter on a post on one of the several ‘milblogging’ conflict-blogs that I followed a number of years ago. Some of which involved writers, and folks I knew, or areas of the world in which I was somewhat aware, or had colleagues, or friends, or friends of friends who were participating in operations in the area.

Many of them were sad, and often reminded me in many ways of reading about the events involved in the Boer War, as depicted in the Bruce Beresford, 1980 cult classic, “Breaker Morant,” about un-real events in 1901, in South Africa - or Peter Weir’s 1981, “Gallipoli.”

Storytelling about unremarkable specific events in a character’s life that are compelling because they provide an insight into a larger narrative about war, conflict, heroism, empire – and ordinary folks involved in ordinary events who step-up to accomplish extraordinary accomplishments that defy any reasonable explanation.

Through Aber Lenses,” http://throughamberlenses.blogspot.com/, was written by SPC Jordan Shay who was serving as an infantry fireteam leader in the 5th Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment in Iraq; placed like Diyala Province.

Shortly after his post, “The Promised ‘Real’ Post,” was published in August 2009, he was killed in action on September 2, 2009. He poignantly left behind, dedicated friends, avid readers who had gotten to know him through his excellent writing, and a loving family and girlfriend.

This reminds one of the great writers that were killed in World War I. Spc. Shay had gifted voice that brought to life the moment by moment otherwise unremarkable daily events that would become a part of greater collage of a war zone – that made sense, because it made no sense.

To be certain, I did not know Spc. Shay, but to be reading his writing, just before his death, quickly became a touchstone that gave you chills and a pause for thought – a trigger event, if you will, for all the folks on the Carroll County Vietnam Memorial that I knew – or knew of through mutual friends and family. Carroll County was much smaller in those days and in many ways, much-much more closely knit.

I learned early in life, by way of writing experiences, leadership events, the Marine Corps, the Vietnam War, advocating for Civil Rights, sports, or binge-reading southern gothic literature; that success in life is hinged upon how well one deals with tragic setbacks, extreme difficulty and abject failure. The unexplained sudden loss, and totally unpredictable random setbacks that seem to have no relationship to how hard you tried.

During the Vietnam War, we did not talk about the war, our military service, or G_d forbid, our feelings. Even those of us, like me, who never deployed and stayed stateside. And we sure as heck did not write about our experience on a website that could be accessed from all over the world. We kept to ourselves to ‘protect ourselves’ against all the folks in society who brandished the peace symbol, burned the flag, and plead for tolerance for their point of view, who heaped scorn upon us.

The post, “The Promised ‘Real’ Post,” is compelling – as are the heartfelt and meaningful comments, for a change, that filled-in many of the missing pieces of the puzzle. One writer wrote, “This is very painful. We writers take loss very hard, especially when one as young as Jordan passes. We realize that he had so little time to share his gift, and regret he didn't get to share more. But these words --what he saw, how he thought, what he felt, will be with the world forever. Writing was part of his legacy…”

We seem to have some sort of primal-programming to accept loss, and move-on quickly. I guess when the dinosaur ate your best friend, you were not going to survive, if you hung around wallowing in grief when the dinosaur choose to chase you for dessert.

Rest in peace brother, your watch is over we will take it from here, you duty is done here, God has your place in heaven.

Or better yet, paraphrased from someone far brighter than me, “God will be merciful to his good soul. Thank you for your service, dedication, and sacrifice. Rest in Peace. Semper Fidelis from an old Marine. Now for the last time, set that weapon down on pods, on the deck of Heaven's chow hall.”

There are no guarantees in life. Every morning I put on the “The Whole Armor of God” God will be merciful to his good soul. Thank you for your service, dedication, and sacrifice. Rest in Peace. Semper Fidelis from an old Marine. Now for the last time, set that weapon down on pods, on the deck of Heaven's chow hall.

10 Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord and in the power of His might. 11 Put on the whole armor of God that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. 12 For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against principalities, against powers, against the rulers of the darkness of this age, against spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places. 13 Therefore take up the whole armor of God that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand.

14 Stand therefore, having girded your waist with truth, having put on the breastplate of righteousness, 15 and having shod your feet with the preparation of the gospel of peace; 16 above all, taking the shield of faith with which you will be able to quench all the fiery darts of the wicked one. 17 And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God; 18 praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit, being watchful to this end with all perseverance and supplication for all the saints— Ephesians 6: 10-18

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Related:

The last post of 5/20 Milblogger Jordan Shay KIA Iraq Sept 2 2009



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Thank you Jordan for all your work. Rest in peace, your labor is done. We salute you. Your sacrifice will not be forgotten. Kels, let us know if there is anything you need. 

*****

Amesbury soldier killed in Iraq by Marie Szaniszlo |Friday, September 4, 2009|http://www.bostonherald.com|Local Coverage


A 22-year-old Amesbury soldier was killed this week on his second tour of duty in Iraq, town officials said.

Jordan Shay, an E4 leader in an attack company assigned to the 5th Battalion of the 20th Infantry regiment, was killed Tuesday, said Kristen LaRue, director of veteran’s services.

Details about how Shay was killed have not yet been released. But he belonged to the 3rd Stryker Brigade, based in Fort Lewis, Wash., and was on his third tour of duty, LaRue said.

The day before he was killed was the last time he logged on to his MySpace [website] page, where a clock counting down how many days he had left in the Army is still running.

“Our hearts and our prayers are with the Shay family,” she said. “As a community, we are standing together to assist the family in any way.”

Flags have been lowered to half-staff across town in memory of Shay, who graduated from Amesbury High School in 2005.



*****

Friday, September 04, 2009


At times he must have been no more than two hundred feet from me, but I never had the privilege to meet Jordan Shay. Together we chewed up the most inhospitable terrain on earth, and back on Ft. Lewis, we worked daily in the same dilapidated Korean War era barracks. The only connection I shared with Jordan was through the comments section of his blog, which I keep linked on the top of the page under our unit crest. Though our companies faced a heated inter-battalion rivalry, Attack Company was always in the thick of combat with my company, Battle. They shouldered a far greater burden than us, sustaining eight KIAs to our two. Jordan, at 22 years old, saw more combat than a lot of crusty old vets before he could legally buy a beer. For his third combat tour with the 3rd Stryker Brigade, Jordan started a blog to chronicle his experience. He named it Through Amber Lenses, the color of his sunglasses. He wanted to explain to the world what he saw with a bright amber tint.

What I read when I checked his most recent comment section hit me straight in the gut. "RIP Jordan." I rushed to the DoD announcement page and found nothing. Through a Google search I confirmed my worst fear: Jordan Shay, 22 years young, killed in Iraq.


Be sure to check out Spc. Jordan Shay’s blog: http://throughamberlenses.blogspot.com/

Here, pasted below, I want to preserve his last post:

Be sure to go here: http://tinyurl.com/ncujtm   http://throughamberlenses.blogspot.com/2009/08/promised-real-post.html to read the comments – and perhaps say a few words of thanks and condolences.  Keep his family and Kels in your prayers as you enjoy Labor Day, brought to you by the sacrifice of Spc Shay and too many others like him…

2009 (16)
August (7)
July (3)
June (4)
May (2)

20090905 sdsom last post 5 20 Milblogger Jordan KIA Sept 2 2009

http://twitpic.com/glk1a The last post of 5/20 Milblogger Jordan Shay KIA Iraq Sept 2 2009 http://tinyurl.com/njusfk



Be sure to go here http://throughamberlenses.blogspot.com/ leave TY & condolences http://tinyurl.com/ncujtm

Keep his family & Kels n your prayers as you enjoy Labor Day brought 2 you by t sacrifice of men & women n uniform


20090904_ArmyofDudesmokebannerfinal
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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

It was beautiful day for Caroline and me to walk along the Wakefield Valley Trail


It was beautiful day for Caroline and me to walk along the Wakefield Valley Trail. We especially enjoyed that someone had chalked a series of commentaries on the walk and it was also great to see Jacki Reiff and Henry Reiff along the trail. 18Apr2017 Tues.

At noon today, I attended an excellent Historical Society of Carroll County Box Lunch Talk, "Carroll County and the Great War for Civilization"


At noon today, I attended an excellent Historical Society of Carroll County Box Lunch Talk, "Carroll County and the Great War for Civilization," by Jay Graybeal, at Grace Lutheran Church, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. 

It was 100 years ago that the "doughboys" of Carroll County went off to fight in the "war to end all wars." Former HSCC Executive Director Jay Graybeal explores Carroll Countians' roles along the Mexican border and in Europe, civilian war efforts at home, and Armistice Day in Carroll County. http://hsccmd.org/events/box-lunch-talks-4/

At noon today, I attended an excellent Historical Society of Carroll County Box Lunch Talk, "Carroll County and the Great War for Civilization"




At noon today, I attended an excellent Historical Society of Carroll County Box Lunch Talk, "Carroll County and the Great War for Civilization," by Jay Graybeal, at Grace Lutheran Church, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. 

It was 100 years ago that the "doughboys" of Carroll County went off to fight in the "war to end all wars." Former HSCC Executive Director Jay Graybeal explores Carroll Countians' roles along the Mexican border and in Europe, civilian war efforts at home, and Armistice Day in Carroll County. http://hsccmd.org/events/box-lunch-talks-4/

Thanks to our sponsors Jiffy Mart and Carroll County Maryland Office of Tourism for their generous support! For more information call 410-848-6494 x200.

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Getting ready for the 36th annual Westminster Main Street Mile

Getting ready for the 36th annual Westminster Main Street Mile. 12April2017

This Day in History: April 12, 1946 Permanent Auto Tags For Maryland

Vehicle license plates long a topic of interest [Column] Eagle Archives



On April 12, 1946, Maryland Gov. Herbert O'Conor "announced his decision to provide permanent automobile registration tags for motor vehicles in the State," according to a local newspaper.

The Westminster newspaper, the Democratic Advocate, reported O'Conor to have "declared," that using two license plates on each motor vehicle in the state will "save $60,000 annually."

More research is needed to understand how two license plates would save the state money.

"This is the plan we intended to inaugurate a few years ago, but due to the war, and the shortage of metals, our plan had to be delayed," O'Conor said.


One thing is for sure. A quick search of the Maryland General Assembly website indicates that license plates are a perennial hot topic.

During the 2013 regular session, for example, there were 11 bills proposed, ranging from providing special tags for "United States Armed Forces," to changing the law so that only one "registration plate" would be required per vehicle.

For a number of years, the single plate legislation has been introduced by Del. Donald Elliot, a Republican who represents District 4B that includes parts of Carroll and Frederick counties.

In the session that concluded last week, legislators submitted eight bills for consideration, including Elliott's.

The 2014 legislative initiative failed, after receiving an unfavorable report from the Environmental Matters Committee.


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Oriole baseball history includes loss to Westminster in 1885 [Column]
Eagle Archives


By Kevin E. Dayhoff, April 8, 2014 Baltimore Sun Carroll Eagle: http://www.baltimoresun.com/search/dispatcher.front?Query=Dayhoff&target=adv_article



#Baseball, #Westminster, #Orioles, #History, #Carroll County, #Maryland,

Roses are red, violets are blue. I hate snow ... and you should too.

For those with a bad case of chionophobia — a fear of snow — no worries, spring is near. We know this because last Monday was Opening Day for the Baltimore Orioles.

After yet another unexpected Maryland snowstorm, the weather gave way to warmer temperatures and blue skies on March 31.

According to The Baltimore Sun, "a sellout crowd of 46,685 filled the ballpark" to see the Orioles defeat the defending world champion Boston Red Sox, 2-1.

Baseball has a long history in Baltimore. The current Baltimore Orioles franchise began playing baseball in 1954 in the old Memorial Stadium on 33rd Street, after it was announced on Sept. 28, 1953, that the St. Louis Browns were moving to Baltimore.


Historian Jay Graybeal researched the event for the Historical Society of Carroll County several years ago and wrote, "One of the great stories from the County's sports history is the June 1885 baseball game between the Westminster Base Ball Club and the Baltimore Orioles. …"

Graybeal quoted an old newspaper article which noted, "The Westminster Base Ball Club on Monday last, the 22d, won the most remarkable victory in their history, defeating (the) Baltimore team by a score of 9 to 7."

On that same date in 1962, Boog Powell became the first player to hit a ball over the hedge in center field at Memorial Stadium, according to a book of Orioles history by Ted Patterson.
Go Orioles.


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March 30, 1923: A gang of 25 Baltimore men attempted to rob Carroll County distillery.

The robbers received some buckshot in the hide, but no liquor.

By Kevin Dayhoff, March 30, 2014



On March 30, 1923, in the depths of prohibition, a local newspaper rang the alarm that “About 25 men, all from Baltimore, it is reported, attempted to raid McGinnis Distillery in Carroll County, just east of Westminster.”

It needs to be noted that although prohibition, known as the “Volstead Act,” did not go into effect throughout the nation until January 20, 1920; Carroll countians voted to outlaw the sale of alcohol in the county six-years earlier - in 1914, according to research by historian Jay Graybeal for the Historical Society of Carroll County.

Prohibition remained the law of the land until President Franklin Roosevelt signed into law the Cullen-Harrison Act on March 23, 1933.

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Westminster Methodist minister Lowell Ensor helped raise awareness of civil rights in 1940s

Anyone remember the Rev. Dr. Lowell Ensor, the pastor at the Westminster United Methodist from 1940 – 1947 and later became the president of Western Maryland College – now McDaniel, from 1947 – June 30, 1972? http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-eagle-archives-0323-20140325,0,3448847.story

[...]

By Kevin Dayhoff, March 25, 2014

In 1945, institutional racism in Maryland was a hot topic. In part, the discussion was driven by pragmatism in that, according to research by historian Kenneth D. Durr, more than 20 percent of the population in Baltimore was said to be black. But because of housing segregation laws, the city's black population was squeezed into 2 percent of the city's land mass.

Lowell Ensor would later assume the office of president of the college, now McDaniel, on July 1, 1947, according to Lightner's history of the college, "Fearless and Bold." He served until June 30, 1972, and died in 1975.

Lowell Ensor would later assume pres of college now McDaniel 1Jy1947, according to Lightner's, "Fearless and Bold." http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-eagle-archives-0323-20140325,0,3448847.story

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Current tensions in Ukraine bring back memories of Cold War
Eagle Archives

By Kevin Dayhoff, March 19, 2014

Who can remember the school air raid drill in which you were to hide underneath your desk – or in the hallway? Remember, drop to the floor, duck and cover your head, to protect yourself from flying debris and getting burned by the nuclear blast. Some schools distributed dog tags so that the bodies of the dead students could easily be identified.


On March 16, 1972, an article in The Carroll Record explained one of the basic building blocks of the Cold War era, the fallout shelter.

"Today's Paper Has Community Fallout Shelter Plan — The new community fallout shelter plan for Carroll County is included in this newspaper. …"

The article reported, "According to the County commissioners, 'The information developed in the plan could save the lives of thousands of persons in the event of attack. …' "

The recent tensions between Russia and the West over the civil unrest in the Ukraine and Crimean Peninsula have renewed an interest in Cold War nostalgia.

[…]


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Streets and history of Westminster intersect at odd angles [Eagle Archives]



Many residents today may not recall the crazy-quilt "dog leg" intersection of John, Bond and Main streets, or the equally mismatched collision of Main and Liberty streets, Railroad Avenue, and the train tracks in Westminster.

Years ago, these intersections did not look anything like they do now. Today, they form a perfect "cross."

But years ago, a motorist traveling south on John Street or Railroad Avenue had to make a 90-degree right turn onto Main Street, then hang a quick left to get on either Liberty or Bond Street and get through the intersection.

It may have worked well enough in the horse and buggy days. But by the 1970s, it was nuts.

Finally, sanity ruled and the two intersections and the bridge over the railroad tracks on East Green Street were rebuilt in the mid-1970s.

Many years ago, the area that we now know as John and Carroll streets in Westminster was known as the "space between."


Related








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####

Westminster Patch:
Kevin Dayhoff Westminster Online: http://www.kevindayhoff.org
Kevin Dayhoff Art: www.kevindayhoff.com
Kevin Dayhoff Politics: www.kevindayhoff@net

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Westminster Methodist minister Lowell Ensor helped raise awareness of civil rights in 1940s

Anyone remember the Rev. Dr. Lowell Ensor, the pastor at the Westminster United Methodist from 1940 – 1947 and later became the president of Western Maryland College – now McDaniel, from 1947 – June 30, 1972? http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-eagle-archives-0323-20140325,0,3448847.story

[...]

By Kevin Dayhoff, March 25, 2014

In 1945, institutional racism in Maryland was a hot topic. In part, the discussion was driven by pragmatism in that, according to research by historian Kenneth D. Durr, more than 20 percent of the population in Baltimore was said to be black. But because of housing segregation laws, the city's black population was squeezed into 2 percent of the city's land mass.

Lowell Ensor would later assume the office of president of the college, now McDaniel, on July 1, 1947, according to Lightner's history of the college, "Fearless and Bold." He served until June 30, 1972, and died in 1975.


Lowell Ensor would later assume pres of college now McDaniel 1Jy1947, according to Lightner's, "Fearless and Bold." http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/carroll/westminster/ph-ce-eagle-archives-0323-20140325,0,3448847.story
_____________________________

By Kevin E. Dayhoff, kevindayhoff@gmail.com
Story | April 21, 2014 | 12:04 PM
... just endured are hard on a city — and expensive. In a recent edition of the city's newsletter, Westminster Mayor Kevin Utz wrote, "The City has spent all $100,000 of our snow budget plus an additional $50,000 in contingency funds purchasing ...

By Kevin E. Dayhoff, 
Story | April 15, 2014 | 5:52 AM
On April 12, 1946, Maryland Gov. Herbert O'Conor "announced his decision to provide permanent automobile registration tags for motor vehicles in the State," according to a local newspaper.

By Kevin E. Dayhoff, 
Story | April 8, 2014 | 5:38 AM
There were actually at least two sports stadiums in Northeast Baltimore at 33rd Street and Ellerslie Avenue in what was once a city park by the name of Venable Park. The first, Baltimore Municipal Stadium, began operations Dec. 2, 1922.

By Kevin Dayhoff, kevindayhoff@gmail.com
Story | March 25, 2014 | 12:16 PM
In 1945, institutional racism in Maryland was a hot topic. In part, the discussion was driven by pragmatism in that, according to research by historian Kenneth D. Durr, more than 20 percent of the population in Baltimore was said to be black.

By Kevin Dayhoff, 
Story | March 19, 2014 | 8:06 AM
"Today's Paper Has Community Fallout Shelter Plan ? The new community fallout shelter plan for Carroll County is included in this newspaper. ?"

By Kevin Dayhoff, 
Story | February 5, 2014 | 4:37 AM
... received an imported breech-loading shotgun. Throughout his career he gave away 5,000 guns representing sales of 5,000,000 cigars!" When he is not admiring the artwork on the old cigar labels,Kevin Dayhoff may be reached at .
By Kevin E. Dayhoff, 
Story | February 17, 2014 | 1:57 PM
... City, a vast collection of skyscrapers and a thriving economic center that may be best described as the Hong Kong of Latin and South America. If he is not showing pictures of his trip to Panama to friends, Kevin Dayhoff may be reached at

By Kevin Dayhoff Story | February 12, 2014 | 3:15 AM
... College: 621 employees • Carroll County Commissioners: 587 employees • Carroll Community College: 509 employees • Evapco: 440 employees When he is not counting the days until spring, KevinDayhoff may be reached at .

By Kevin Dayhoff, Story | March 4, 2014 | 8:42 AM Many residents today may not recall the crazy-quilt "dog leg" intersection of John, Bond and Main streets, or the equally mismatched collision of Main and Liberty streets, Railroad Avenue, and the train tracks in Westminster. Years ago, these intersections did not look anything like they do now.

Long-standing history of ground-rent on property in Westminster [Column] By Kevin E. Dayhoff, Story | March 11, 2014 | 1:12 PM In the last several weeks, articles in the Baltimore Sun report that a ruling by the Maryland Court of Appeals "tossed-out” an ambitious legislative effort" to address what some lawmakers perceived as abusive practices on the part of some ground-rent owners in Maryland.

Kevin Dayhoff is an artist - and a columnist for: Patuxent Publishing Co., The Carroll Eagle: www.explorecarroll.comhttp://www.explorecarroll.com/search/?s=Dayhoff&action=GO








Kevin Dayhoff's The New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/ = www.newbedfordherald.net

Tumblr: Kevin Dayhoff Banana Stems www.kevindayhoff.tumblr.com/



E-mail: kevindayhoff(at)gmail.com

My http://www.explorecarroll.com/ columns appear in the copy of the Baltimore Sunday Sun that is distributed in Carroll County: https://subscribe.baltsun.com/Circulation/

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Kevin Dayhoff is an artist - and a columnist for:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/kevindayhoffTwitpic: http://twitpic.com/photos/kevindayhoff
Kevin Dayhoff's The New Bedford Herald: http://kbetrue.livejournal.com/ = www.newbedfordherald.net

Tumblr: Kevin Dayhoff Banana Stems www.kevindayhoff.tumblr.com/
Smurfs: http://babylonfluckjudd.blogspot.com/
Google profile: https://profiles.google.com/kevindayhoff/

E-mail: kevindayhoff(at)gmail.com
My http://www.explorecarroll.com/ columns appear in the copy of the Baltimore Sunday Sun that is distributed in Carroll County: https://subscribe.baltsun.com/Circulation/
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